On Outlaws

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On Outlaws

Post by Karma on Sun May 21, 2017 6:57 pm

OUTLAWS
Outlaws in General
There were only three statuses conceivable to the Gorean mind outside the caste system: slave, outlaw, and Priest-King. A man who refused to practice his livelihood or strove to alter status without the consent of the Council of High Castes was, by definition, an outlaw and subject to impalement. (Tarnsman of Gor, chapter three)
 
For that matter, though I did not seriously consider the possibility, being without a city, in effect an outlaw, I was entitled in the Gorean way of thinking to take the bird (tarn) or its purchase price in any way I saw fit. (Outlaw of Gor, chapter six, page 50)
 
..he is only a warrior, a man with no city to call his own, thus an outlaw. (Outlaw of Gor, chapter twenty six, page 253)

Appearance
I now dressed myself in the scarlet garb of a warrior of Gor. I was puzzled that the garb, like the helmet and shield, bore no insignia.  This was contrary to the ways of Gor, for normally only the habiliments of outlaws and exiles, men without a city, lack the identifying devices of which the Gorean is so proud.  (Outlaw of Gor, chapter two)
 
“What do you want?” asked the carrier of wood, who must now have noticed that my shield and accouterments bore no insignia, and would have concluded that I was an outlaw. (Outlaw of Gor, chapter three, page 28)
 
“You are an outlaw,”  he said.  “That I can see by the lack of insignia on your shield and tunic.” (Outlaw of Gor, chapter seven, page 61)

"He had his hand lifted. He, too, wore skins. His hair was long and shaggy. There was a steel sword at his side.
I handed the glass of the Builders to Rim, who stood by the rail at my side.
He grinned. "I know him," he said. "He is Arn."
"Of what city?" I asked.
"Of the forests." said Rim.
I laughed.
Rime, too, laughed.
Only too obviously the man was outlaw.
Now, behind him, similarly clad in skins, their hair bound back with tawny strips of panther hide, were four or five other men, men doubtless of his band. Some carried bows, two carried spears.
The man whom Rim had identified as Arn, an Outlaw, now came forward, passing before the two frames, closer down to the beach's edge."
pg 19, Chapter 2, - place, exchange point 50 pasangs north of Lydius  Hunters of Gor (8th book), DAW Books Inc, Donald A Wollheim, Publisher, Copyright 1974 by John Norman, 1st printing, March 1974

Cities of Outlaws
"What is your name? I asked him. He now had a name, for he was free.
"Rim," he said proudly.
I did not ask him his city, for he was outlaw. Outlaws do not care to reveal their city. pg 15 place - Port Kar Hunters of Gor (8th book), DAW Books Inc, Donald A Wollheim, Publisher, Copyright 1974 by John Norman, 1st printing, March 1974

Exchange Points
"High on the beach, I saw two pairs of sloping beams. They were high, large and heavy structures. The feet of the beams were planted widely, deeply, in the sand; at the top, where they sloped together, they had been joined and pegged. They were rather like the English letter "A," though lacking the crossbar. Within each "A," her wrists bound by wrapped and taut leather to heavy rings set in the sloping sides, there hung a girl, her full weight on her wrists. Each wore the brief skins of forest panthers. They were panther girls, captured. Their heads were down, their blond hair falling forward. Their ankles had been tied rather widely apart, each fastened by leather to iron rings further down the beams.
It was an exchange point.
It is thus that outlaws, to passing ships, display their wares." pg 18, Chapter 2, place - 50 pasangs north of Lydius Hunters of Gor (8th book), DAW Books Inc, Donald A Wollheim, Publisher, Copyright 1974 by John Norman, 1st printing, March 1974

Male vs Female
Male and female outlaws do not much bother one another at the exchange points. They keep their own markets. I cannot recall a case of females being enslaved at an exchange points, as they bargained with their wares, nor of males being enslaved at their exchange points, when displaying and merchandising their captures. If the exchange points became unsafe for either male or female outlaws, because of the others, the system of exchange points would be largely valueless. The permanency of the point, and its security, seems essential to the trade." pg 27 chapter 2 Hunters of Gor (8th book), DAW Books Inc, Donald A Wollheim, Publisher, Copyright 1974 by John Norman, 1st printing, March 1974
Northern Forest
"What were you doing in the northern forests?" I asked him.
"I am an outlaw." he said proudly. pg 13
"Commonly," said he, "I plundered beyond the forests" He looked at the slave girl. "Sometimes," said he, "I plundered within them" pg 14  Hunters of Gor (8th book), DAW Books Inc, Donald A Wollheim, Publisher, Copyright 1974 by John Norman, 1st printing, March 1974

Peasants and Outlaws:
The peasant on Gor does not fear the outlaw, for he seldom has anything worth stealing, unless it be a daughter.  Indeed, the peasant and outlaw on Gor live in an almost unspoken agreement, the peasant tending to protect the outlaw and the outlaw sharing in return some of his plunder and booty with the peasant.  The peasant does not regard this as dishonest on his part, or as grasping. It is simply a way of life to which he is accustomed.  It is a different matter, of course, if it is explicitly known that the outlaw is from a city other than one’s own.  In that case he is usually regarded as an enemy, to be reported to the patrols as soon as possible.  He is, after all, not of one’s city.  (Outlaw of Gor, chapter six, pages 48-49)

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